Study for Flood Management and Water Quality Funding

Fayetteville is growing faster than our current stormwater system can support. A combination of more high-intensity rainfall and growth of hard surfaces have contributed to flooded streets and properties, among other drainage issues, which can ultimately impact the quality of our drinking water source, Beaver Lake.

Thankfully, in the April bond election the residents of Fayetteville voted in favor of implementing the City’s Drainage Improvement Plan, developed after the major flooding event of 2017. The drainage projects outlined in this plan have been identified as top priorities to kickstart improvement of the city’s stormwater management. However, once these projects are completed, an ongoing and sustainable effort will be required to maintain a quality stormwater management system over time.

All hard surface areas that do not allow rainwater to drain through, such as rooftops, driveways and parking lots, are responsible for stormwater runoff, and every developed property contributes to the runoff from these hard-surface areas. The most equitable way to address the ongoing management of the City’s stormwater system is to charge a reasonable fee to each property owner based on the amount of hard surface area on their property.

The City embarked on a Flood Management and Water Quality Funding study to assess what services are currently provided in our stormwater management system, and compared those efforts with a more proactive approach to reduce flooding and pollutants that impact water quality. Staff presented those results to a City Council Stormwater Committee to consider possible options for new services that would enable the City to get ahead and stay ahead of these issues. The Council Committee will review the study and consider whether to accept the results while continuing to seek public feedback on proceeding with the implementation of a stormwater fee.

Public outreach events: September 20, 2018 (Ozark Natural Foods); September 22, 2018 (Fayetteville Farmers' Market); January 9, 2019 (Fayetteville Public Library); January 10, 2019 (Arkansas Research & Technology Park); January 17, 2019 (Boys & Girls Club)

This is the second of a series of surveys to inform the Study. Survey #2 is intended to assess your priorities for how the Stormwater Utility fees may be used.


For more information about the study, view the City of Fayetteville's Stormwater Study web page.


Fayetteville is growing faster than our current stormwater system can support. A combination of more high-intensity rainfall and growth of hard surfaces have contributed to flooded streets and properties, among other drainage issues, which can ultimately impact the quality of our drinking water source, Beaver Lake.

Thankfully, in the April bond election the residents of Fayetteville voted in favor of implementing the City’s Drainage Improvement Plan, developed after the major flooding event of 2017. The drainage projects outlined in this plan have been identified as top priorities to kickstart improvement of the city’s stormwater management. However, once these projects are completed, an ongoing and sustainable effort will be required to maintain a quality stormwater management system over time.

All hard surface areas that do not allow rainwater to drain through, such as rooftops, driveways and parking lots, are responsible for stormwater runoff, and every developed property contributes to the runoff from these hard-surface areas. The most equitable way to address the ongoing management of the City’s stormwater system is to charge a reasonable fee to each property owner based on the amount of hard surface area on their property.

The City embarked on a Flood Management and Water Quality Funding study to assess what services are currently provided in our stormwater management system, and compared those efforts with a more proactive approach to reduce flooding and pollutants that impact water quality. Staff presented those results to a City Council Stormwater Committee to consider possible options for new services that would enable the City to get ahead and stay ahead of these issues. The Council Committee will review the study and consider whether to accept the results while continuing to seek public feedback on proceeding with the implementation of a stormwater fee.

Public outreach events: September 20, 2018 (Ozark Natural Foods); September 22, 2018 (Fayetteville Farmers' Market); January 9, 2019 (Fayetteville Public Library); January 10, 2019 (Arkansas Research & Technology Park); January 17, 2019 (Boys & Girls Club)

This is the second of a series of surveys to inform the Study. Survey #2 is intended to assess your priorities for how the Stormwater Utility fees may be used.


For more information about the study, view the City of Fayetteville's Stormwater Study web page.