Short-Term Rentals: Public Comment

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A short-term rental is the leasing out of a furnished residential dwelling on a short-term basis, generally less than 30 days.

It is estimated that there are approximately 500-600 short-term rental units in Fayetteville. However, Fayetteville’s codes do not have specific rules or allowances for short term rentals. In July 2019 the City Council adopted a resolution directing staff to study and develop an ordinance for short-term rentals for their consideration.

The City of Fayetteville is inviting City residents to provide feedback, ask questions, and help us identify issues around this topic.

Please use the Guestbook feature below to post your comments, or ask a question via the Q&A tab. We appreciate your input!


Next Step: City Council Meeting(s)

A presentation of the draft code was presented to the City Council for their consideration and potential adoption on December 1, 2020. The Council moved to table the item until the January 5, 2021 Council meeting. This meeting will allow for public comment and staff will present amendments to the proposed ordinance based on feedback from Council and members of the public. For more information on how to listen in or participate in City Council meetings, click here.





A short-term rental is the leasing out of a furnished residential dwelling on a short-term basis, generally less than 30 days.

It is estimated that there are approximately 500-600 short-term rental units in Fayetteville. However, Fayetteville’s codes do not have specific rules or allowances for short term rentals. In July 2019 the City Council adopted a resolution directing staff to study and develop an ordinance for short-term rentals for their consideration.

The City of Fayetteville is inviting City residents to provide feedback, ask questions, and help us identify issues around this topic.

Please use the Guestbook feature below to post your comments, or ask a question via the Q&A tab. We appreciate your input!


Next Step: City Council Meeting(s)

A presentation of the draft code was presented to the City Council for their consideration and potential adoption on December 1, 2020. The Council moved to table the item until the January 5, 2021 Council meeting. This meeting will allow for public comment and staff will present amendments to the proposed ordinance based on feedback from Council and members of the public. For more information on how to listen in or participate in City Council meetings, click here.





Guest Book

Please share with us your comments and suggestions regarding the potential regulation of short-term rentals within the City of Fayetteville. What are your concerns? What do you think are the key issues? 
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I see two different types of regulation in this, and I am in favor of one type and opposed to the other - the density cap regulation creates a lot of ambiguity and thus inequity about who will be allowed to utilize their property for rentals. If current units are grandfathered in - this unduly advantages those already owning short-term rentals, and some of the proposals also create some information asymmetry issues in determining whether a short-term rental already exists in an area or complex. Reducing the income-generating potential of a neighbor's property by creating your own short-term rental is unfair, but it also seems likely that a neighbor might not know if they were out of compliance, especially if they did not use the same service to list their rental. I do think regulations on the use and tax of the properties make a lot of sense - preventing event promotion in residential areas is sensible, making sure they chipping in on local taxes paid by hotels is fair... basically making sure this use of property does not adversely impact neighbors or shirk taxes levied on this type of use makes sense. Trying to cap the number of short-term rentals, to me, seems less much useful (unless you are already an existing short-term rental owner). If there is a glut of these properties, rental prices will fall, and this will a) drive more rentals and more economic activity and b) drive some STR operators out of the market. This cap is counterproductive and creates unnecessary inequities in the housing market - a new homeowner in 5 years might not be afforded the same opportunity with their home that current owners enjoy if the cap is reached.

C.A. about 2 months ago

Concerned that this is a solution in search of a problem.Seems like it could create more problems than it solves: If this is complaint-driven, these regulations essentially put anxious, fearful, or jealous neighbors in charge of what a property owner does with their private property, and there are already plenty of anti-annoyance ordinances that they could avail themselves of.

Not Applicable 2 months ago

Removed by moderator.

v tight gel 3 months ago

I am not against regulation per se, but please consider a clause/exception that allows for more than 2 apartments/condos per building, at least for those who have already owned their condos for some time. I do not currently use my condo as a short-term rental, but purchased it several years ago after being told there was no regulation on short-term rentals for the building (it is near Dickson, so I believe it's in a "mixed use" zone), knowing that this could be an option for me at some point. I have noticed that several units have recently started being used as AirBNBs in the complex. If, as the current policy states, those unit owners are "grandfathered in" and allowed to continue on AirBNB, I would not even have a chance to apply for a license with the proposed condo/apartment density cap, as it is already met. It feels a bit fairer to allow a 6-month to 1-year grace period for all condo/homeowners to get the business license for their primary residence, particularly if they purchased their homes prior to the city's discussion of this issue. This should still help control the issue of people newly buying up several properties/condos just to use as short-term rentals (which could potentially reduce affordable housing options), but would accommodate people who purchased their home believing that they would be able to rent it out for a few weeks/weekends a year (e.g., when having to travel for work), which can really help one out financially when money is tight.

Wayne 3 months ago

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JOhn Kamblugh 6 months ago

We have one short term rental and are looking to build a couple more within city limits this year. I appreciate the thought and consideration that are going into these proposals. I believe the inspections and business licenses are long overdue. And, the idea of limiting the number of STRs will greatly increase the value and quality of each one that is licensed and keep the market from being oversaturated. It would be helpful to know how these licenses will be handled once the 2% limit is reached. Will there be a waiting list? When someone sells a property that is a type-2 STR does that license pass on to the new owner? What is that current number and how close are we to the limit? Thanks for the time that has been put into this and we look forward to "legitimizing" the sector as a whole. I really believe it will greatly increase the quality and uniqueness that makes Fayetteville a great place to visit and live!

Karyn Siebert 7 months ago

I agree with Keith, It can hurt the community with absent landlords, with no kind of regulation. I have also had properties like this in my community, I currently own a Landscaping Service so I would take care of the yards of the absent landlords for the sake of my community.

lawn1234 11 months ago

There are several houses in our neighborhood in south Fayetteville that are becoming full-time short term rental properties. So far, no real problems. However, they completely take away the possibility of building community and sense of neighborhood. One block is completely empty except for one house that is occupied other than on game days and rental times. The negatives that I was mostly worried about (partying, wildness like is occurring with this in Austin TX or Nashville TN with absent landlords who provide no regulation, etc..) so far hasn't come to pass, but it does completely take away the possibility of positives - neighbors and connection and support of local businesses and heck, even landscaping the yard to make our neighborhood prettier. So, for me that is a major negative.

Keith 11 months ago

I was planning on living in my condo, which is off Garland ave in a building with 6 units, and “airbnb-ing” it on the weekends when I am not there on the weekends, this was my plan for the last half of 2020 and moving forward. I haven’t “airbnb-ed” yet so I’m not a current short term property yet. Is there anything I can do to keep this as my plan for the future?.

Jonathan H 11 months ago

In my humble opinion, I think requiring a home owner to waive his 4th amendments rights and be subjected to inspection by government agents (code inspectors) in order to be extended the right, to rent out a room in their own house, by non-elected city planners is outrageous. The public does not need the government to protect them from folks wanting to rent out a room. Wake up folks. This permitting and licensing regime by unelected "bureau-hacks" is an attack on your personal rights and freedom.

Corbitt Law 12 months ago

Our short term renters are amazingly considerate of our shared driveway with our neighbor. Sadly, our neighbor has made it clear she wants to buy our house and apparently made a quite a stir at the last planning meeting. Ironically she made it clear to my wife and I that she wants to buy it to rent out for herself. Incredibly her house has an ADU that transients stay in constantly. Lesson: Beware of cutthroats influencing short term rental policy for personal gain. Sadly my wife and I want to feel welcome in our own neighborhood when we move into our house in a few years when I retire. I still can't believe people in my hometown are like this. Is this what's moved in while I was gone?

Hometown Boy 12 months ago

Retraction from Gary Karnes regarding yesterday's comment, replacing it in total with the following:My comments yesterday came from the emotion of the moment after reading Sunday's article in the DemGaz. After doing a little research and asking questions, I have learned that a subdivison's protective covenants overrule what the city might put on the books, but of course, you might have to end up in court to enforce your covenants. This was explained to me by our City Planning Director. I live in a neighborhood that is zoned RMF-24 which is one of the higher density zoning districts. The units are townhomes, in duplex form, and thus attached. I feel confident that strangers coming & going would be quite noticeable and I think this would be the case in many of the higher density multi-family zoning districts. On the other hand, a friend who lives in low density zoning district, explained to me yesterday, that there is a vacation rental down the street from him and that he has no issue with it. Our covenants state, "no commercial activities" and hopefully, we can prevent vacation rentals if it becomes an issue in our neighborhood. It seems to me, that when homeowners and landlords have the right to rent their properties on a daily basis and receive dollars in return, and, when the city requires a business permit to operate, it is hard to think of the property as anything but commercial. If residential & multi-family zoning is approved for VRs, then I hope the affected neighborhoods have covenants they can lean on should VRs become an issue in their neighborhoods. I'm sure there has been a much thought and work on this issue and hopefully it will be resolved in an just manner.

Gary Karnes 12 months ago

Not happy about any short term rentals in single-family zoning. Short terms rentals are only allowed now in commercial & mixed-use zoning as it should be. Enforce the code, please . . . don't change the code to placate up to 500 owners who are breaking the law currently. We have a whole lot more homeowners in Fayetteville than those 500. "Business permits" really? in single-family neighborhoods? Sounds very commercial to me. I hope the Planning Commission will put a halt to this proposal and ask the require the city to start enforcing what is already on the books. I personally live in a neighborhood where the homes are fairly close together. If a residence across the street operates as a motel or hotel with strange people coming and going daily, it simply violates our rights as property owners who thought they were buying a home in a strictly residential neighborhood. I hope that our covenants will prevail in stating "no commercial activity" but from what I am reading it doesn't sound like it. If this passes, hopefully there will be a coalition engaged to take the City to court over what I think many will consider to be an unjust decision. As stated in the paper, "The City Council authorized planners last year to look into regulation "after staff realized short-term rentals are technically against city code." Sounds like somebody dropped the ball on code enforcement.

Gary Karnes 12 months ago

I purchased a primary residence in the city and use it for Airbnb to help cover the cost of my mortgage when I travel for the national guard and my primary employer. I purposefully chose and purchased the house to be both appealing to myself and to any potential guests. I hire a cleaner and manager on an as-needed basis and contribute to our local economy with their employment. I would not have been able to buy a large home in the primary location without the short-term rental income to help cover the mortgage. I strive to maintain my Superhost status on Airbnb and provide excellent service to my guests, not just the basic safety items that are required. I don't understand why we would over-regulate people's ability to make some side income and pass it to those who have the time, money, and team to scale their operations throughout the city, like the investors and hospitality management groups of hotels. Don't turn our city into a hotel operation, let homeowners earn some income from their investments.

Citizen 12 months ago

If the requirement for the agent is to be available to be on-site within an hour, why require that they have a permanent address within the City of Fayetteville? They can easily get there in half that time from as far away as Bella Vista.The limitation of short-term rental licenses to a maximum of two dwelling units in any multifamily building, regardless of overall total units in the multifamily building, is rather obnoxious and unfair to property owners. This limit should be removed.The draft code makes lots of reference to "owner". How does this play out for individuals that rent or lease the property? I'm with most of the other residents that have already commented - this seems like a lot of over-regulation from a city that should be focusing on more important things like maintaining the terrible roads or cleaning up illicit drug use by our permanent resident neighbors rather than inventing problems from these short-term rental people.

Ryan 12 months ago

I do not have any concerns about short term rentals. This is a service I have used and would rather stay in a home like setting vs a hotel. Also provides additional income for those who want to stay in the home when the home is larger than needed. I have had long term renters in the past and do not have as much control over as I do with short term rentals.

Karen about 1 year ago

The biggest problems with rentals are not short term rentals. People using companies such as Airbnb generally have cleaner, well regulated rentals through that company already and any further city interference would discourage development in the city. Let short term renters have their freedom. Taxes collected on those properties are enough without adding any extra burden through increased regulation.

No more por favor about 1 year ago

You have enough on your plate to take care of. Let the people of the city live their lives without constant government supervision. Concentrate on what your real duties are. Maintaining the streets in a fashion that does not require having pot holes the size of basketballs would be one area I would suggest.

JR about 1 year ago

I don't think there should be very strict ordinances for this. If someone owns property they should be able to use it however they see fit within reason. Short term rentals are great and should not be limited. It's nice as someone who as used many of them to have options and with the university and other cultural draws to the area, short terms rentals are great especially due to the lack of hotels in the area.

Llcornelsen about 1 year ago

A property owner should be able to use their property as they see fit without interference from the government. Through property taxes, they pay for the infrastructure and services the City supplies. The short-term "tenants" most likely will spend money within Fayetteville, thus yielding additional tax income to the City. Furthermore, short-term rentals supply the property owners, who are residents and citizens of Fayetteville, additional income. If spent within the City, more sales tax income is recognized by Fayetteville. This additional income to the City can be spent on roads, schools, police, fire, water, trash, and even parks. Therefore, further regulation of STRs by the City would result in loss of income to two parties: the property owner and the City of Fayetteville. Nobody wins.

JFF about 1 year ago