Short-Term Rentals: Public Comment

A short-term rental is the leasing out of a furnished residential dwelling on a short-term basis, generally less than 30 days.

It is estimated that there are approximately 500-600 short-term rental units in Fayetteville. However, Fayetteville’s codes do not have specific rules or allowances for short term rentals. In July 2019 the City Council adopted a resolution directing staff to study and develop an ordinance for short-term rentals for their consideration.

The City of Fayetteville is inviting City residents to provide feedback, ask questions, and help us identify issues around this topic.

Please use the Guestbook feature below to post your comments, or ask a question via the Q&A tab. We appreciate your input!


Public Input Meeting:

The City will be hosting an open public input meeting about short-term rentals:

September 30, 2019
5:30 – 7:30 pm
Room 326, City Hall


Focus Group Notes

On August 9, the City convened a focus group to discuss issues around short-term rentals. You may view the notes from this meeting in the Documents column at right.



A short-term rental is the leasing out of a furnished residential dwelling on a short-term basis, generally less than 30 days.

It is estimated that there are approximately 500-600 short-term rental units in Fayetteville. However, Fayetteville’s codes do not have specific rules or allowances for short term rentals. In July 2019 the City Council adopted a resolution directing staff to study and develop an ordinance for short-term rentals for their consideration.

The City of Fayetteville is inviting City residents to provide feedback, ask questions, and help us identify issues around this topic.

Please use the Guestbook feature below to post your comments, or ask a question via the Q&A tab. We appreciate your input!


Public Input Meeting:

The City will be hosting an open public input meeting about short-term rentals:

September 30, 2019
5:30 – 7:30 pm
Room 326, City Hall


Focus Group Notes

On August 9, the City convened a focus group to discuss issues around short-term rentals. You may view the notes from this meeting in the Documents column at right.



Please share with us your comments and suggestions regarding the potential regulation of short-term rentals within the City of Fayetteville. What are your concerns? What do you think are the key issues? 
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The biggest problems with rentals are not short term rentals. People using companies such as Airbnb generally have cleaner, well regulated rentals through that company already and any further city interference would discourage development in the city. Let short term renters have their freedom. Taxes collected on those properties are enough without adding any extra burden through increased regulation.

No more por favor 14 days ago

You have enough on your plate to take care of. Let the people of the city live their lives without constant government supervision. Concentrate on what your real duties are. Maintaining the streets in a fashion that does not require having pot holes the size of basketballs would be one area I would suggest.

JR 17 days ago

I don't think there should be very strict ordinances for this. If someone owns property they should be able to use it however they see fit within reason. Short term rentals are great and should not be limited. It's nice as someone who as used many of them to have options and with the university and other cultural draws to the area, short terms rentals are great especially due to the lack of hotels in the area.

Llcornelsen 23 days ago

A property owner should be able to use their property as they see fit without interference from the government. Through property taxes, they pay for the infrastructure and services the City supplies. The short-term "tenants" most likely will spend money within Fayetteville, thus yielding additional tax income to the City. Furthermore, short-term rentals supply the property owners, who are residents and citizens of Fayetteville, additional income. If spent within the City, more sales tax income is recognized by Fayetteville. This additional income to the City can be spent on roads, schools, police, fire, water, trash, and even parks. Therefore, further regulation of STRs by the City would result in loss of income to two parties: the property owner and the City of Fayetteville. Nobody wins.

JFF 28 days ago

Look at your past ordinances and revise them to help ease our housing crunch. Short term rentals are not a problem. Short term rentals fit a very specific need in a college town anyway, let good things happen. More importantly it is not your business who someone invites into their home or what their arrangement is. We already have ordinances regarding how many unrelated people can live in a single family home at once, renters or owners... doesn't matter, this is covered. A little less of an authoritarian approach from the city would be appreciated.

MLF 29 days ago

Leave people alone. Don’t hurt people and prevent them from making additional income to support themselves and their families. Don’t hurt people. Don’t take their stuff. Don’t restrict a person’s liberty and personal property rights.

FayettevilleLibertyResident about 1 month ago

Turning Homeowners into Outlaws: How Anti-Home-Sharing Regulations Chip Away at the Foundation of an American Dream Christina SandefurGoldwater InstituteAbstract“Home-sharing” may sound like a modern invention, part of the cutting-edge, high-tech “sharing economy.” In fact, home-sharing is a centuries-old American tradition. For generations, people have let visitors stay in their homes, rather than in hotels, sometimes in exchange for money or for doing chores. The only difference now is that the practice has become more efficient: the internet has enabled homeowners and travelers to connect better than ever before, and online home-sharing platforms such as Airbnb and Homeaway now help millions of homeowners rent rooms or houses to help pay their bills. Most importantly, home-sharing represents an important new way for property owners to exercise their basic right to choose whether to let someone stay in their home — a right the Supreme Court has called “one of the most essential sticks in the bundle of rights that are commonly characterized as property.” Yet cities nationwide have responded to innovations in home-sharing not by welcoming this economic opportunity or respecting the rights of property owners, but by imposing draconian new rules that deprive Americans of some of their most basic constitutional rights. From New York City to Santa Monica, places with bustling tourism economies are rushing to restrict homeowners from offering rooms in their homes to travelers. These regulations hurt communities and punish the responsible majority of property owners for the potential wrongs of a few. Worse, these laws violate fundamental constitutional protections, impose arbitrary searches on homeowners, discriminate against non-residents, and subject them to extreme punishment without fair warning or clear guidelines. This article surveys some of the most egregious home-sharing restrictions and some of the ways they violate critical constitutional rights. First, this article explains that the recent rash of home-sharing restrictions results from the fact that, with few exceptions, courts have permitted government to deprive owners of their right to use property so long as government technically does not take title to the land. Next, the article explores how home-sharing restrictions, while aimed at the use of property, have actually deprived Americans of other constitutional rights, including privacy. The article then identifies and addresses some of the primary arguments in favor of home-sharing restrictions and explains why those arguments do not justify stifling property rights and other freedoms. Finally, the article proposes alternatives to outright bans, and ways government can regulate home-sharing to address legitimate concerns without violating constitutional rights

HomeOwner/Criminal about 1 month ago

I believe there should be a limit to the number of Airbnb units per residential lot in single family zoned areas. I know an individual who will soon have 5 units in the historic district in association with the residential lot where they live. This seems to be too many to me. They are not being built as an improvement to the community as a whole. Most individuals that build or renovate their homes in a historic district have a very public view about what they are doing; in other words they care how their single family home renovations fit into the urban historic landscape. So many Airbnbs clearly are for one and one thing only - to make money. Are the owners building quality construction that blends in or compliments the character of other buildings in the historic district? All construction of houses to be used for Airbnbs no matter what type of residential community they are built in should be subject to some sort of construction quality control, or at least be built to the same standards and appearance as the homes in the area. If people living in urban single family homes think they should have the total freedom to do as they wish with their property they should be required to read Garrett Hardin's, "Tragedy of the Commons."

GGH about 1 month ago

I understand that property owners believe it is their right to do with there homes as they wish. However, if Airbnb and other short-term rentals take place within a neighborhood, that means that other citizens of the city are affected by a given property owner's actions as well as those of their renters. Therefore, I think it's imperative for the city to gather as much information as possible about issues that are cropping up in a cities with such rentals. And I believe that there should be recourse for neighbors around such a short term rental when problems arise.

C. L. about 2 months ago

There should be an ordinance that short term rentals be required to follow the POA rules or covenants of the neighborhood the property is located in (if any) and occupancy should be based on the same rule as long-term rentals.I've read through all the literature provided and must say that I disagree with most of it. It seems to me that most of this is theoretical rather than based on actual statistics. I went to the Air BNB site and reviewed the listings. There are VERY FEW homes listed there that could be considered low cost housing for students or lower income families. Most are expensive homes/condos in higher end/ trendy locations or they are private rooms or studios in a homeowner's personal residence. "It just takes one disaster"....this is true of anything and is not a sensible argument. The U of A paper states there have only been 6 short term rental complaints in 3 years. With the AirBNB report of 533 listings in Fayetteville and "hundreds" more according to the City's report - I conclude this is an excellent statistic. There is no ordinance or regulation that could prevent just one disaster from occurring.It surprises me that concern over parking is being raised. It surprises me that concern over the aesthetic of the properties is being raised. The City has TOTALLY ignored parking issues - from allowing multiple apartment/townhouse new construction to congest our beautiful streets by allowing street parking to the total disregard of our own high school students lack of parking at their own school. I don't believe this is an issue for short term rentals. There are greater parking issues in our town.Students don't have a shortage of housing in Fayetteville. Enrollment is down at the U of A so I don't see a shortage in the near future either.Most new home construction in Fayetteville right now cannot be considered affordable for low income families. I look at the low income housing areas in Fayetteville and the City is allowing new construction to purchase and tear down affordable housing and build housing that is absolutely NOT affordable for people in these areas. I don't believe you can hold short term rental owners to this issue when you don't hold developers to this issue.I ask the City Planner, Mayor and City Council to try and be more sensible dealing with this ordinance than it has been with ordinances and regulations in the recent past.

Ali about 2 months ago

I am a property owner neighboring a short term rental home. To be completely honest, I hate having it as a neighbor. The renters I would say, not quite half the time but frequently enough, are disrespectful to the people who actually live in the neighborhood. They frequently park directly in front of my house and stay up late making a racket. Bike Blues & BBQ is the absolute worst. My wife and I hate being at home, much less within Fayetteville that weekend. Without fail each year a dozen bikers take up residence in this three bedroom home across the street for two or three nights, revving their motorcycles all hours of the day and night and blocking the street we live on with all their toys on wheels they bring with them. This is just one weekend out of the year and the rest of the time as previously stated it is maybe 1 out of every 2 or 3 renters that are an aggravation. Many are well-meaning people that are just in town to visit their college kids or go to a game. With all that said, I am a 100% believer in the rights of the property owner. I do not believe STR's should be subject to further regulation or taxation. I do not believe a property owner should require the government's permission to rent out their property. The government's responsibility is to ensure the civil rights of it's citizens. So long as the renters across the street are not imposing upon my life and liberty then I think the government should stay out.

Kyle about 2 months ago

I and my wife live on a fixed income. Our right and ability to utilize short term rentals to make ends meet puts food on our table and pays the bills.I have not heard a valid argument against it, just a lot of complaining. Folks that stick their noses where they don't belong, whatever happened to minding your on business. We pay enough taxes and fees. A fee is just another name for more revenue. In short no more regulations, taxes or folks interfering with how I butter my bread, BUTT OUT !! Folks and bug off already! You are effecting my Life, Liberty, and pursuit of Happiness, and have no say how or what I do with my property. Keeping Fayetteville Funky...Folks...one last thought if you hate big business and are for the ma and pa business...then well!!! Here I am...Butt Out! Mind your own Peas and Carrots amen!!!!!

Z50K about 2 months ago

In the new sharing economy, short term rentals provide a valuable service to both the host and the traveler. Income from my short-term rental allows me to pay my property taxes, to keep the lights and water on and to provide food for my family. Without the extra income, my family would be in dire straights trying to survive. Short-term rental platforms, like Airbnb, collect the following taxes:1. General Sales and Use Tax (Washington Co.)2. Accommodations Tax (Arkansas)3. General Sales and Use Tax (Arkansas)4. Lodging Tax (Fayetteville)5. General Sales and Use Tax (Fayetteville)6. Accommodations Tax (Fayetteville)It seems to be that we are paying enough taxes and that over-regulating short term rentals is just another tax to be disguised as a fee. Whether that “fee” is for having to obtain a permit to operate a short-term rental or paying an annual fee to have a short-term rental. I would be very much against any cap on the number of days I can rent out my short-term rental. Such a cap would restrict my income that my family needs to make ends meet. This is my property after all and I should be allowed to do with it what I want as long as it is legal. I have private property rights as an owner of my own home. Any attempt to over-regulate short- term rentals in Fayetteville is an infringement of my private property rights. The argument that short-term rentals remove affordable housing stock is invalid in Fayetteville. To date, almost 6 percent of rentals are empty in Fayetteville and more apartments continue to be built daily. Currently, there are approximately 600 listed short-term rentals on the Airbnb website for Fayetteville, Arkansas. They consist of all types of housing at all ranges of prices. Regulating such a small percentage of the housing stock in Fayetteville seems like a waste of community resources.I request that you thoughtfully and carefully consider any regulation of the short-term rental industry in Fayetteville as it provides supplemental income to the property owners which is greatly needed in a town where working wages are low.

StayOutofMyPockets about 2 months ago

The vast majority of cities that have enacted formal STR regulation allowed way too many outside investors at the outset and then had extremely difficult situations when they realized that type II STRs have decimated the local community, destroyed neighborhoods, displaced minority/low-income citizens, made affordable housing impossible, and created animosity between absentee landlord/investors and the very people who made the community attractive in the first place. Now almost every city has restricted STRs to primary residences only. Type I STRs (owner occupied or primary residence) do exactly the opposite. They allow low-income families opportunities to keep their home, elders to age in place, they better utilize existing infrastructure through infill, provide rich experiences between diverse individuals, and keep communities whole and well-maintained. The problems of noise, traffic, party houses, and all the rest are all corrected by only allowing type I. All these other cities have learned this so WHY IS FAYETTEVILLE NOT LEARNING FROM THE WELL-DOCUMENTED EXPERIENCE OF OTHERS?! If an outside investor comes in and builds or converts multiple properties with the sole intention of using them as STRs, they are HOTELS, not homeowners and should be regulated that way. Don't destroy our existing hotels, price out locals, and eviscerate the communities that bring people here in the first place. Keep type I STRs and prohibit Type II. The IRS can enforce Primary Residence rules, so why can't Fayetteville?

RCC about 2 months ago

I am not in favor of short term rentals in established neighborhoods. I live on East maple and the house on the corner of Walnut and Maple is short term rental - apparently for parties. There is only street parking for this house and I'm not happy it is in the neighborhood where there are established families.

East Maple about 2 months ago

Several studies have already been published regarding the gentrification effects of short-term units within a community. A more proactive approach of this city's resources would be to work with its state government to determine what is feasible in regards to implementing an enforceable ordinance. I recall a time when the city decided to ban Uber/Lyft services only to have that decision overturned with Act 1050 at the state level.

Abraham C. about 2 months ago

The description above says nothing about taxing. I am a Fayetteville homeowner which is my secondary residence. We have thought about the possibility of leasing through AirBnB or some other type in the future. I don't know that we will do that; however, I would like to have the opportunity. I do think that there should maybe be a central registry with the city so that neighbors can get in touch with the owner in the event of a problem and that also provides the city with information for the A&P tax or whatever it is called. I would like to see the ordinance that comes out of committee.

MKF about 2 months ago

I believe they have been great on bringing in visitors to Fayetteville and NWA. Personally, I stay in Airbnb over hotels to allow me to spend more money on food, drinks, and adventures when visiting a city. I also enjoy the unique characteristics of the Airbnb homes compared to a hotel chain. I believe the funkiness of Fay sets up the perfect partnership with Airbnb as well as allowing people to spend more money in our local economy. It also puts extra money in the pockets of people who own the unit locally as well as taxes and fees Airbnb pays to the State of Arkansas and or City of Fayetteville.

Coston about 2 months ago

I'm not against some kind of regulation. I have an airbnb. I hope you will choose a moderate model of regulation.I've had no issues with my airbnb. I think as a whole airbnbs in Fayetteville have been good for the city.Kathy

Kathy about 2 months ago

The market and consumers will ensure that these places are kept clean. If you don't believe me, watch the effect of a bad review. If you force this regulation, places will start to deteriorate and decline. The system encourages a top notch experience and makes the city more viable. STRs are good for the cleanliness and appearance of properties. Homeowners in Fayetteville have no duty to ensure that we have housing restrictions in order to keep down rental prices. The city already gets tax $. Increased regulation means declining performance. Government - Stay out of people's homes and business!

Kat100 about 2 months ago