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Why do we ask you to register for Speak Up Fayetteville?

Why do we ask you to register to take part in the surveys and other tools on Speak Up Fayetteville? There are several reasons.

  1. When you register with your email address, we can keep you updated on the status of projects we know you are interested in. We can also send you notices when new surveys or forums become available regarding other projects, so you can stay informed and engaged with your city government.
  2. Once you've registered, we don't have to keep asking you for your zip code or other demographic information each time you post to a forum or complete a survey, since those simple questions are part of your registration process.
  3. Your registration information helps us to ensure that we are getting feedback from a good cross-section of city residents and/or visitors, providing a more accurate picture of public opinion, or showing us where we need to focus our community engagement efforts.

Rest assured, we will never provide any other entity or organization with your personal information or email address.

If you haven't yet registered with Speak Up Fayetteville, we invite you to do so today and get started sharing your ideas and opinions with your city! If you have already registered, thank you for providing us with your feedback, and please come back regularly to share your thoughts with us. We value your input!

Why do we ask you to register to take part in the surveys and other tools on Speak Up Fayetteville? There are several reasons.

  1. When you register with your email address, we can keep you updated on the status of projects we know you are interested in. We can also send you notices when new surveys or forums become available regarding other projects, so you can stay informed and engaged with your city government.
  2. Once you've registered, we don't have to keep asking you for your zip code or other demographic information each time you post to a forum or complete a survey, since those simple questions are part of your registration process.
  3. Your registration information helps us to ensure that we are getting feedback from a good cross-section of city residents and/or visitors, providing a more accurate picture of public opinion, or showing us where we need to focus our community engagement efforts.

Rest assured, we will never provide any other entity or organization with your personal information or email address.

If you haven't yet registered with Speak Up Fayetteville, we invite you to do so today and get started sharing your ideas and opinions with your city! If you have already registered, thank you for providing us with your feedback, and please come back regularly to share your thoughts with us. We value your input!

Guest Book

Hi there. Thanks for visiting Speak Up Fayetteville.  Please sign our guestbook and let us know what you think of the City's new public engagement portal!
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Hello. I like this site and the opportunity to leave comments. I'm all for open communication between citizens and city officials. That seems to be a strong factor in the healthy government of Fayetteville. I hope input is appreciated. My comment today is about Centennial Park and Markham Hill. I am very worried about the development possibilities of Markham Hill and am wondering about whether or not there could be a connection made between the two for use as bike/hike trails. I think there is already an underpass between the two sides of I-40. Maybe that could be the connection point. It would make the trails more accessible to students on the University side and add to the trails of Centennial Park. Even if this couldn't immediately be developed, perhaps the city could preserve the land for this future use?

DBassi about 3 years ago

I have lived on Elizabeth Avenue between Rolling Hills and Old Wire Road since 1990. I love having sidewalks and bike lanes but I must comment on the pilot project on Rolling Hills. The problem for all us living in the area is making left turns either leaving or entering neighborhoods from Rolling Hills. I have heard that the installation is to stop cars from passing on the right--that only happens when someone is trying to turn left and other cars are backed up. The installation hinders defensive driving. During heavy evening traffic, cars hug and cross the center lane at the 71B intersection light heading West, causing cars going East to be pushed over now. Also, the poles at the intersections now cause drivers to swing out across the center line to make a right turn. I don't think all of us have collectively forgotten how to turn right. Since the installation, I have seen two people walking in the bike lane instead of on the sidewalk. One had a flashlight and was jogging at night. This is very dangerous. Although I am not easily distracted, this installation distracts me every time I drive on Rolling Hills and especially in the evening. On our part of Elizabeth Avenue, I am sure we have more daily walkers than a whole month on Rolling Hills or Old Wire and we have no sidewalk. It is the cut-through path between the two roads for everyone. Children walk on the road to visit friends. I understand that the city is having a study conducted to look at "ways to alleviate congestion, improve aesthetics, enhance safety and usher development." I believe the Rolling Hills pilot project fails all of the above.

Kathy Spigarelli over 3 years ago

The bicycle lanes on Rolling Hills and elsewhere need to be removed. They’re dangerous for drivers and bicyclists alike! Lawsuits await, I’m afraid.
Thanks, Makii Watson

barrefly22 over 3 years ago

I would like for all future street
Lights to be projected downward and existing lights to be replaced as funds become available to limit light pollution. It would be lovely to see the stars again.

The Arts Corridor sounds lovely but not as the expense of parking for the Walton ArtsCenter and Dickson Street.

Thanks, Makii Watson

barrefly22 over 3 years ago

Random shout-out: I have had two positive experiences with the Public Works Department in the past month -- a call for a clogged sewer line was met with a crew arriving within 45 minutes, and fixing it in short order. A call for a clogged drainage ditches was responded to the same day. Much appreciated all around.

RobWells over 3 years ago

First, the link that was supposed to permit comments on the changes to bike lanes is strangely not to be found!
About the seeing and experiencing changes to some of the bike lanes, I think that they are completely ridiculous! Has anyone tried to turn from Market on to Rolling Road? With the reduced lane width it is impossible without either crossing into the on-coming lane or running over the lane markers. A big deal is made about making car drivers more cautious -- what about making bikers more cautious? Bikes are not automobiles but want to be treated as same. The road system was built for cars. Now the bikes want a share of the lane space where none exist. Further, many bikers (no, not all) pay no attention to the rules-of-the-road (i.e., laws),. They weave through traffic, run traffic signals, fail to signal turns, etc. I remember several years ago when the city had an open display of several potential improvements for the city and environs. Each attendee was given a number of poker-type chips with containers in front of each display showing a potential improvement type. A group of bikes came in wearing their riding outfits, took their chips and immediately dropped them into the container associate with more bike lanes -- they never looked at any other option! That is not civic mined actions in my opinion.
Shortly after the changes to Rolling Road, I made several trips through and around the city, mostly on the northern end. I saw lane after lane full of automobiles, vans and trucks. In about a weeks time of observations, I say one single biker. That, to me, illustrates the clear fact that bikers are demanding and receiving a disproportionate amount of the available road space and funds.

FeedUpWithBikers over 3 years ago

I live in South Fayetteville and use College Avenue for traveling to North Fayetteville and my typical pathway to east Fayetteville is Rolling Hills. I am so disappointed that this vital connector road has been literally destroyed by these unused bike lanes that make it dangerous for vehicles going through and those who turn off Rolling Hills are in an even more precarious position with all of these ridiculous poles marking intersections. There are many, many tax dollars spent on bike trails that cars can’t use so I fail to understand how taking away half of our motor vehicle roads to give to bikers is acceptable. Please return Rolling Hills to motor vehicles and stop this nonsense of trying to get everyone to use bicycles to travel. Trust me, you don’t want our elderly population on bicycles in close proximity to moving vehicles. The city needs to represent our entire community and not just their own age group or interest group. She Calaway

Sue Calaway over 3 years ago

A few comments:
1. Parking Structures
a. Please screen lights from view (i.e. indirect lighting so light source not visible outside the structure)
b. Locate ramps to the interior or hide sloped walls architecturally (please do not depend on vines for this as they are usually seasonal unless use Hedera helix).
c. Provide planting space at the perimeter to screen / buffer structure
2. Sidewalks - please make them as wide as possible. 4' is single file so wider is better. Many people in town walk and do not bike (due to replaced joints, etc). Walks are important as alternative transportation.
3. Curb shapes within public right-of-way
a. Please curve them to be visually consistent with the majority of curbs in the City's public rights-of-way.
b. Please make radii large enough for the many large pick-up trucks or large cars or someone's Great Aunt Ethel. Thanks!
4. L.I.D. + Public Art: Is this too many notes visually?
5. L.I.D. - please select plant material for these areas that is 'tried & true' and visible since the finish grade is typically lower than the F.S. of the adjacent vehicular pavement. Generally, L.I.D.s are problematic because they catch trash, the 'green' is not as visible & possible bug breeding grounds. If possible, please use permeable walks to collect water to be filtered & leave the F.G. of planting areas with more positive relationship to the F.S. of the roadway.
6. Design Comments on West Ave Portion
a.NE Corner of West & Dickson: In lieu of sculpture, or in addition to sculpture, by cafe seating: consider adding more shade giving elements like trees. Can occur in a way that will still provide a terminus to the axis of the water course.
b. Provide more shade-giving trees on west side of West Avenue. Perhaps add more between parking while preserving parking spaces.
c. Not sure about Chihuly-esque are elements...it's colorful and fun but it's been done - a lot.
Love our landscape architect's work at the Citygarden Sculpture Park. Very well done with classic shapes & elements that will stand the test of time for the City of St. Louis. Looking forward to something with equal longevity style-wise in Fayetteville.
Thank you for reading! All the best to the design team. You are doing a great job!

Lee Anne over 3 years ago

About the proposed arts district and concerns about parking for WAC: has the city considered a shuttle bus service that would be free-of-charge that would run in a frequent continuous loop to and from the WAC so that parking at a more distant lot would be feasible?

SGR over 3 years ago

Please do not take the parking lot away. Last Saturday evening I was almost refused parking in the lot because I did not have my theater ticket with me( my daughter-in-law had them). Also my friend could not park in the ramp as she did not have a reservation. We were not aware that reservations were needed in the ramp. This does not benefit customers of Walton Arts shows that come into town. Linda Hagers

Guest over 3 years ago

I support the development of a Cultural Arts Corridor provided that the development includes additional PROXIMITY PARKING to Dickson Street and Walton Arts Center in order for me to continue visiting the area.

Liz Fulton over 3 years ago

I support the development of a Cultural Arts Corridor provided that the development includes additional PROXIMITY PARKING

Liz Fulton over 3 years ago

Good idea

Liz Fulton over 3 years ago

I own the parking deck attached to The Dickson. This 260 space parking deck is available to the public. Over 50% of the deck would normally be available to the public at anytime. I don't see this option in any of the plans for parking. I think that removing all the parking on the West lot is a bad idea. We need to maintain the parking that gets removed in a parking deck or under part of the green space that is being proposed. I like the idea of exposing the stream that is in this area.

Ted Belden over 3 years ago

I now have received 2 emails telling me to complete my registration and when I've gone to do again---which I initially did, it tells me I'm already signed in-- this is confusing

Educator over 3 years ago

Is this the only site being considered? I know this is the "easy site" - because it's open and the city owns it. But developing it the way the planners envision will in my opinion harm the existing arts organizations and businesses in the area. I would like to know if the planners considered other sites. If they only considered the one site - I would like to know why.

Kent Blochberger over 3 years ago

Like this site. But have concerns about new Art Corridor taking West Street parking area. I have volunteered at WAC for 15 years. One of the biggest complaints is like of parking. This causes patrons to be late to shows. I can’t image the nightmare with this parking lot being taken away.

Susan Bolding over 3 years ago
Page published: 17 Sep 2018, 09:17 AM