Short-Term Rentals: Public Comment

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A short-term rental is the leasing out of a furnished residential dwelling on a short-term basis, generally less than 30 days.

It is estimated that there are approximately 500-600 short-term rental units in Fayetteville. However, Fayetteville’s codes do not have specific rules or allowances for short term rentals. In July 2019 the City Council adopted a resolution directing staff to study and develop an ordinance for short-term rentals for their consideration.

The City of Fayetteville is inviting City residents to provide feedback, ask questions, and help us identify issues around this topic.

Please use the Guestbook feature below to post your comments, or ask a question via the Q&A tab. We appreciate your input!


Step 1. Focus Group Meeting 1

As the first step in studying short-term rentals, the City hosted a focus group on August 19, 2019 to discuss the issue. The focus group represented various perspectives including neighborhood representatives and concerned citizens, rental owners and managers, and hotel owners. The group was guided by a professional facilitator to identify key issues and recommendations in moving forward with local rules for short-term rentals. View the first Focus Group Notes here. (pdf)

Step 2. Public Input Meeting

The City hosted a public input meeting about short-term rentals on September 30, 2019. Click here to view the notes from the public input meeting. (pdf)

Step 3. Focus Group Meeting 2

On January 15, 2020, the City hosted a second focus group meeting to review and comment on the first draft code for short-term rentals. Click here to view the notes from the second focus group meeting. (pdf)

Step 4. Planning Commission Meeting(s)

The draft code for short-term rentals will be discussed at the Planning Commission meeting on February 10, 2020 at 5:30 p.m. in Room 219 of City Hall

Step 5. City Council Meeting(s)

After the Planning Commission meeting, the final step will be presentation of the draft code to the City Council for their consideration and potential adoption.




A short-term rental is the leasing out of a furnished residential dwelling on a short-term basis, generally less than 30 days.

It is estimated that there are approximately 500-600 short-term rental units in Fayetteville. However, Fayetteville’s codes do not have specific rules or allowances for short term rentals. In July 2019 the City Council adopted a resolution directing staff to study and develop an ordinance for short-term rentals for their consideration.

The City of Fayetteville is inviting City residents to provide feedback, ask questions, and help us identify issues around this topic.

Please use the Guestbook feature below to post your comments, or ask a question via the Q&A tab. We appreciate your input!


Step 1. Focus Group Meeting 1

As the first step in studying short-term rentals, the City hosted a focus group on August 19, 2019 to discuss the issue. The focus group represented various perspectives including neighborhood representatives and concerned citizens, rental owners and managers, and hotel owners. The group was guided by a professional facilitator to identify key issues and recommendations in moving forward with local rules for short-term rentals. View the first Focus Group Notes here. (pdf)

Step 2. Public Input Meeting

The City hosted a public input meeting about short-term rentals on September 30, 2019. Click here to view the notes from the public input meeting. (pdf)

Step 3. Focus Group Meeting 2

On January 15, 2020, the City hosted a second focus group meeting to review and comment on the first draft code for short-term rentals. Click here to view the notes from the second focus group meeting. (pdf)

Step 4. Planning Commission Meeting(s)

The draft code for short-term rentals will be discussed at the Planning Commission meeting on February 10, 2020 at 5:30 p.m. in Room 219 of City Hall

Step 5. City Council Meeting(s)

After the Planning Commission meeting, the final step will be presentation of the draft code to the City Council for their consideration and potential adoption.




Guest Book

Please share with us your comments and suggestions regarding the potential regulation of short-term rentals within the City of Fayetteville. What are your concerns? What do you think are the key issues? 
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There should be an ordinance that short term rentals be required to follow the POA rules or covenants of the neighborhood the property is located in (if any) and occupancy should be based on the same rule as long-term rentals.I've read through all the literature provided and must say that I disagree with most of it. It seems to me that most of this is theoretical rather than based on actual statistics. I went to the Air BNB site and reviewed the listings. There are VERY FEW homes listed there that could be considered low cost housing for students or lower income families. Most are expensive homes/condos in higher end/ trendy locations or they are private rooms or studios in a homeowner's personal residence. "It just takes one disaster"....this is true of anything and is not a sensible argument. The U of A paper states there have only been 6 short term rental complaints in 3 years. With the AirBNB report of 533 listings in Fayetteville and "hundreds" more according to the City's report - I conclude this is an excellent statistic. There is no ordinance or regulation that could prevent just one disaster from occurring.It surprises me that concern over parking is being raised. It surprises me that concern over the aesthetic of the properties is being raised. The City has TOTALLY ignored parking issues - from allowing multiple apartment/townhouse new construction to congest our beautiful streets by allowing street parking to the total disregard of our own high school students lack of parking at their own school. I don't believe this is an issue for short term rentals. There are greater parking issues in our town.Students don't have a shortage of housing in Fayetteville. Enrollment is down at the U of A so I don't see a shortage in the near future either.Most new home construction in Fayetteville right now cannot be considered affordable for low income families. I look at the low income housing areas in Fayetteville and the City is allowing new construction to purchase and tear down affordable housing and build housing that is absolutely NOT affordable for people in these areas. I don't believe you can hold short term rental owners to this issue when you don't hold developers to this issue.I ask the City Planner, Mayor and City Council to try and be more sensible dealing with this ordinance than it has been with ordinances and regulations in the recent past.

Ali 9 months ago

I am a property owner neighboring a short term rental home. To be completely honest, I hate having it as a neighbor. The renters I would say, not quite half the time but frequently enough, are disrespectful to the people who actually live in the neighborhood. They frequently park directly in front of my house and stay up late making a racket. Bike Blues & BBQ is the absolute worst. My wife and I hate being at home, much less within Fayetteville that weekend. Without fail each year a dozen bikers take up residence in this three bedroom home across the street for two or three nights, revving their motorcycles all hours of the day and night and blocking the street we live on with all their toys on wheels they bring with them. This is just one weekend out of the year and the rest of the time as previously stated it is maybe 1 out of every 2 or 3 renters that are an aggravation. Many are well-meaning people that are just in town to visit their college kids or go to a game. With all that said, I am a 100% believer in the rights of the property owner. I do not believe STR's should be subject to further regulation or taxation. I do not believe a property owner should require the government's permission to rent out their property. The government's responsibility is to ensure the civil rights of it's citizens. So long as the renters across the street are not imposing upon my life and liberty then I think the government should stay out.

Kyle 9 months ago

I and my wife live on a fixed income. Our right and ability to utilize short term rentals to make ends meet puts food on our table and pays the bills.I have not heard a valid argument against it, just a lot of complaining. Folks that stick their noses where they don't belong, whatever happened to minding your on business. We pay enough taxes and fees. A fee is just another name for more revenue. In short no more regulations, taxes or folks interfering with how I butter my bread, BUTT OUT !! Folks and bug off already! You are effecting my Life, Liberty, and pursuit of Happiness, and have no say how or what I do with my property. Keeping Fayetteville Funky...Folks...one last thought if you hate big business and are for the ma and pa business...then well!!! Here I am...Butt Out! Mind your own Peas and Carrots amen!!!!!

Z50K 9 months ago

In the new sharing economy, short term rentals provide a valuable service to both the host and the traveler. Income from my short-term rental allows me to pay my property taxes, to keep the lights and water on and to provide food for my family. Without the extra income, my family would be in dire straights trying to survive. Short-term rental platforms, like Airbnb, collect the following taxes:1. General Sales and Use Tax (Washington Co.)2. Accommodations Tax (Arkansas)3. General Sales and Use Tax (Arkansas)4. Lodging Tax (Fayetteville)5. General Sales and Use Tax (Fayetteville)6. Accommodations Tax (Fayetteville)It seems to be that we are paying enough taxes and that over-regulating short term rentals is just another tax to be disguised as a fee. Whether that “fee” is for having to obtain a permit to operate a short-term rental or paying an annual fee to have a short-term rental. I would be very much against any cap on the number of days I can rent out my short-term rental. Such a cap would restrict my income that my family needs to make ends meet. This is my property after all and I should be allowed to do with it what I want as long as it is legal. I have private property rights as an owner of my own home. Any attempt to over-regulate short- term rentals in Fayetteville is an infringement of my private property rights. The argument that short-term rentals remove affordable housing stock is invalid in Fayetteville. To date, almost 6 percent of rentals are empty in Fayetteville and more apartments continue to be built daily. Currently, there are approximately 600 listed short-term rentals on the Airbnb website for Fayetteville, Arkansas. They consist of all types of housing at all ranges of prices. Regulating such a small percentage of the housing stock in Fayetteville seems like a waste of community resources.I request that you thoughtfully and carefully consider any regulation of the short-term rental industry in Fayetteville as it provides supplemental income to the property owners which is greatly needed in a town where working wages are low.

StayOutofMyPockets 9 months ago

The vast majority of cities that have enacted formal STR regulation allowed way too many outside investors at the outset and then had extremely difficult situations when they realized that type II STRs have decimated the local community, destroyed neighborhoods, displaced minority/low-income citizens, made affordable housing impossible, and created animosity between absentee landlord/investors and the very people who made the community attractive in the first place. Now almost every city has restricted STRs to primary residences only. Type I STRs (owner occupied or primary residence) do exactly the opposite. They allow low-income families opportunities to keep their home, elders to age in place, they better utilize existing infrastructure through infill, provide rich experiences between diverse individuals, and keep communities whole and well-maintained. The problems of noise, traffic, party houses, and all the rest are all corrected by only allowing type I. All these other cities have learned this so WHY IS FAYETTEVILLE NOT LEARNING FROM THE WELL-DOCUMENTED EXPERIENCE OF OTHERS?! If an outside investor comes in and builds or converts multiple properties with the sole intention of using them as STRs, they are HOTELS, not homeowners and should be regulated that way. Don't destroy our existing hotels, price out locals, and eviscerate the communities that bring people here in the first place. Keep type I STRs and prohibit Type II. The IRS can enforce Primary Residence rules, so why can't Fayetteville?

RCC 9 months ago

I am not in favor of short term rentals in established neighborhoods. I live on East maple and the house on the corner of Walnut and Maple is short term rental - apparently for parties. There is only street parking for this house and I'm not happy it is in the neighborhood where there are established families.

East Maple 9 months ago

Several studies have already been published regarding the gentrification effects of short-term units within a community. A more proactive approach of this city's resources would be to work with its state government to determine what is feasible in regards to implementing an enforceable ordinance. I recall a time when the city decided to ban Uber/Lyft services only to have that decision overturned with Act 1050 at the state level.

Abraham C. 9 months ago

The description above says nothing about taxing. I am a Fayetteville homeowner which is my secondary residence. We have thought about the possibility of leasing through AirBnB or some other type in the future. I don't know that we will do that; however, I would like to have the opportunity. I do think that there should maybe be a central registry with the city so that neighbors can get in touch with the owner in the event of a problem and that also provides the city with information for the A&P tax or whatever it is called. I would like to see the ordinance that comes out of committee.

MKF 9 months ago

I believe they have been great on bringing in visitors to Fayetteville and NWA. Personally, I stay in Airbnb over hotels to allow me to spend more money on food, drinks, and adventures when visiting a city. I also enjoy the unique characteristics of the Airbnb homes compared to a hotel chain. I believe the funkiness of Fay sets up the perfect partnership with Airbnb as well as allowing people to spend more money in our local economy. It also puts extra money in the pockets of people who own the unit locally as well as taxes and fees Airbnb pays to the State of Arkansas and or City of Fayetteville.

Coston 9 months ago

I'm not against some kind of regulation. I have an airbnb. I hope you will choose a moderate model of regulation.I've had no issues with my airbnb. I think as a whole airbnbs in Fayetteville have been good for the city.Kathy

Kathy 9 months ago

The market and consumers will ensure that these places are kept clean. If you don't believe me, watch the effect of a bad review. If you force this regulation, places will start to deteriorate and decline. The system encourages a top notch experience and makes the city more viable. STRs are good for the cleanliness and appearance of properties. Homeowners in Fayetteville have no duty to ensure that we have housing restrictions in order to keep down rental prices. The city already gets tax $. Increased regulation means declining performance. Government - Stay out of people's homes and business!

Kat100 9 months ago

Inserting government regulation will do two things, raise costs and chase business away. If landlords aren’t performing, the market will do its job and lower rentability through reviews. Reduce tax and spend problem in Fayetteville. People should be free to utilize their property for their own use, including renting it out.

kat100 9 months ago

Arkansas landlords are used to operating with absolutely zero oversight. It's no wonder they're up in arms about short-term rentals. No laws on habitability, no leverage for renters. What a joke that "the market" will ensure people maintain their property and respect their neighbors. The comments posted here clearly reflect that landlords care much more about their own individual profit than the collective good of the community. I hope the city will carefully consider issues such as parking, noise, human trafficking, transparency for neighbors and potential homeowners (though it's usually pretty clear where the airbnb spaces are), and habitability and safety for renters. I'd love to see limits on non-primary residences being rented out, but I don't expect it to happen.

S_B 9 months ago

We’ve had two Airbnb’s close to downtown at different times, and lived next door to a full time Airbnb owned by someone else. I think it’s a great tool for people to be able to use to make extra money from their property or help to pay off an ADU. They can also help preserve historic homes (especially small ones) better than full time renters, because it makes the same income but is only occupied 30-50% of the time, with frequent cleaning and ability to see inside if there is a problem to fix it. The Airbnb next door was a great neighbor, we never had any issues with noise or parking. The owner fixed up the house nicely (which it needed) before renting it out. Our average guests in the Airbnb we currently own are parents of UA students and single women in town for business. The average stay is 3-7 days (long enough you want a kitchen and some space beyond a hotel room). I don’t think Airbnb’s are a replacement for hotels, but they are an important alternative. Football and festival weekend guests are nice, but it’s such a small part of visitors to Fayetteville.I think our existing noise and parking ordinances cover the main issues well. Unneighborly behavior isn’t excused by having a long lease - complaints of illegal parking and loud parties can already result in towed cars and shut down parties. I do think the automatic Hospitality tax through Airbnb is a great feature. It was a pain registering, keeping track of it and sending in paper forms and checks to the state. I don’t think the ordinance should limit Airbnb’s to a specific zoning type. Not all visitors are going downtown, and such a huge percentage of our city is RSF-4. The ordinance should protect all neighbors from the (honestly very rare) loud party house Airbnb, but the same way it protects neighbors from any loud party house.

AT 9 months ago

Who is sitting around thinking this stuff up? My goodness folks. Stop taxing and start spending wisely. You start taxing/regulating Airbnb’s and they raise the rents. People will be less likely to stay in those Airbnb’s and take their business elsewhere. Don’t chase off revenue. Are the coffers getting low? How about not building more pointless bike trails?? What did the tunnel under Old Missouri cost? How much revenue is that expected to generate in the next FY? This is just plain ridiculous! Stay out of it.

TPatrick 9 months ago

I love traveling to other towns and utilizing short term rentals - it's a great way to experience the town as locals do. And I love the idea of people experiencing Fayetteville in the same way. Let's welcome this type of business with open arms and not hamper or hinder it.

AC 9 months ago

I live in the entertainment district across from a house that is an airBNB. They are very considerate but they do not always honor the parking restrictions. there are 2 to 3 spots at the house but they still have cars sometime park on street in non marked spots that make it difficult to get my car out from time to time.

Filgee2 9 months ago

As a native to Fayetteville who currently resides out of state I am disappointed to see the current liberal slide to a stance of “if you can dream, we can tax it”. Enough!! If it were not for the short-term rental market, my condo would go unused. I use my place when back in town for games or visiting family thus full time rental is not an option. Plus without guests at places like mine you are going to hurt the tourist income dollars that subsequently get spent in Fayetteville entertainment district. You screw with this market those $s will go somewhere else. As someone who loves Fayetteville, please focus your energy elsewhere, such as cleaning up College Ave. It looks like a cross between a used car lot and a dumpster fire when I visit.

Jco 9 months ago

Doesn't the city already make 2% hotel tax off the short term rentals? Stay the hell out of it. We don't need more ordinances and regulations for what we choose to do with our personal property - that we already pax taxes on.

MTR 9 months ago

This is not an issue for the Government to be involved in. It is simply a tax grab and is viewed as such. I have stayed in many units around the country which are nicely maintained because the actual hosts take pride in their property. They explain this to their guests and the importance of maintaining their property and respect for the neighbors. How about we focus on issues that are important to the citizens of Fayetteville such as traffic on Wedington and MLK at peak times during the day? Any ordinance such as this will only hurt those folks that are actually hosting and spending their money in this city. If I want to rent a room for three days in my house, that is not of concern to the Government. Please stop overreaching. This is obviously not an issue about protecting the citizens, it's about creating income for the city.

KLH 9 months ago